Volume 2, Issue 3
A Two-Patch Predator-Prey Metapopulation Model

G. Quaglia, E. Re, M. Rinaldi & E. Venturino

East Asian J. Appl. Math., 2 (2012), pp. 238-265.

Published online: 2018-02

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  • Abstract

A minimal model for predator-prey interaction in a composite environment is presented and analysed. We first consider free migrations between two patches for both interacting populations, and then the particular cases where only one-directional migration is allowed and where only one of the two populations can migrate. Our findings indicate that in all cases the ecosystem can never disappear entirely, under the model assumptions. The predator-free equilibrium and the coexistence of all populations are found to be the only feasible stable equilibria. When there are only one-directional migrations, the abandoned patch cannot be repopulated. Other equilibria then arise, with only prey in the second patch, coexistence in the second patch, or prey in both patches but predators only in the second one. For the case of sedentary prey, with predator migration, the prey cannot thrive alone in either of the two environments. However, predators can survive in a prey-free patch due to their ability to migrate into the other patch, provided prey is present there. If only the prey can migrate, the predators may be eliminated from one patch or from both. In the first case, the patch where there are no predators acts as a refuge for the survival of the prey

  • Keywords

Complex ecosystems fragmented habitats migrations population models predator-prey equilibria stability

  • AMS Subject Headings

92D25 92D40

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COPYRIGHT: © Global Science Press

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@Article{EAJAM-2-238, author = {G. Quaglia, E. Re, M. Rinaldi and E. Venturino}, title = {A Two-Patch Predator-Prey Metapopulation Model}, journal = {East Asian Journal on Applied Mathematics}, year = {2018}, volume = {2}, number = {3}, pages = {238--265}, abstract = {

A minimal model for predator-prey interaction in a composite environment is presented and analysed. We first consider free migrations between two patches for both interacting populations, and then the particular cases where only one-directional migration is allowed and where only one of the two populations can migrate. Our findings indicate that in all cases the ecosystem can never disappear entirely, under the model assumptions. The predator-free equilibrium and the coexistence of all populations are found to be the only feasible stable equilibria. When there are only one-directional migrations, the abandoned patch cannot be repopulated. Other equilibria then arise, with only prey in the second patch, coexistence in the second patch, or prey in both patches but predators only in the second one. For the case of sedentary prey, with predator migration, the prey cannot thrive alone in either of the two environments. However, predators can survive in a prey-free patch due to their ability to migrate into the other patch, provided prey is present there. If only the prey can migrate, the predators may be eliminated from one patch or from both. In the first case, the patch where there are no predators acts as a refuge for the survival of the prey

}, issn = {2079-7370}, doi = {https://doi.org/10.4208/eajam.160512.280712a}, url = {http://global-sci.org/intro/article_detail/eajam/10875.html} }
TY - JOUR T1 - A Two-Patch Predator-Prey Metapopulation Model AU - G. Quaglia, E. Re, M. Rinaldi & E. Venturino JO - East Asian Journal on Applied Mathematics VL - 3 SP - 238 EP - 265 PY - 2018 DA - 2018/02 SN - 2 DO - http://doi.org/10.4208/eajam.160512.280712a UR - https://global-sci.org/intro/article_detail/eajam/10875.html KW - Complex ecosystems KW - fragmented habitats KW - migrations KW - population models KW - predator-prey KW - equilibria KW - stability AB -

A minimal model for predator-prey interaction in a composite environment is presented and analysed. We first consider free migrations between two patches for both interacting populations, and then the particular cases where only one-directional migration is allowed and where only one of the two populations can migrate. Our findings indicate that in all cases the ecosystem can never disappear entirely, under the model assumptions. The predator-free equilibrium and the coexistence of all populations are found to be the only feasible stable equilibria. When there are only one-directional migrations, the abandoned patch cannot be repopulated. Other equilibria then arise, with only prey in the second patch, coexistence in the second patch, or prey in both patches but predators only in the second one. For the case of sedentary prey, with predator migration, the prey cannot thrive alone in either of the two environments. However, predators can survive in a prey-free patch due to their ability to migrate into the other patch, provided prey is present there. If only the prey can migrate, the predators may be eliminated from one patch or from both. In the first case, the patch where there are no predators acts as a refuge for the survival of the prey

G. Quaglia, E. Re, M. Rinaldi & E. Venturino. (1970). A Two-Patch Predator-Prey Metapopulation Model. East Asian Journal on Applied Mathematics. 2 (3). 238-265. doi:10.4208/eajam.160512.280712a
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